WAYK and Community Organizing

They say that for the person with a hammer, every problem looks like a nail. A few years ago I was formally introduced to community organizing, and yes, now I do see it as an answer to many conundrums. What about language revitalization? There are so many different approaches to it, including academic degrees and… Read more »

Reinventing “Languagization”

One of the things that has struck me so far about this summer has been the “organization” of the team. That word alone doesn’t quite capture what I mean; maybe a better one would be “organizational culture”, a term I’m not that familiar with but seems to do the job. It’s something that has interested… Read more »

Use the Process Tools, but Don’t Let the Process Tools Consume You

One of many things that I appreciated while interning with the WAYK team is that they equip you not only with tools for learning and teaching language, but also with skills to make yourself an all around more effective person. There are many process tools that we use in various capacities, but I think my… Read more »

Layering WAYK with Other Immersion Methods

I was first acquainted with WAYK in 2015, attending a Lingít language circle put on at the University of Alaska Anchorage. I really liked the technique as a way to make language learning fun and to facilitate immersion in a language circle setting. After being introduced to WAYK, I worked at the Alaska Native Heritage… Read more »

Archiving Training: Top Three Takeaways

“It’s got to be here somewhere. It just has to be,” I say to no one in particular. “Where did I put it? I swear someone must have moved it.” If you’ve ever worked on project with a lot of moving pieces or are simply a mere human such as myself, you know the feeling…. Read more »

Archiving Training: Taking a Community-Centered Approach

WAYK’s partnership with the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association (APIA) is now in its third year. This summer WAYK is visiting the Unangam Tunuu Speaking Listening and Teaching (UTSLT) team on St. Paul Island to achieve its main goal: to help novice and intermediate speakers in the community expedite their language acquisition and hone their teaching skills, so that… Read more »

Why I Came Back for Another Summer With WAYK

My name is Erin McGarvey and I am originally from London, Ontario, but am currently living in Edmonton, Alberta. This will be my second year as an intern with Where Are Your Keys? (WAYK). I was introduced to WAYK last summer as an intern during the Summer Language Intensive program on Atka Island, Alaska. As… Read more »

WAYK Summer Team Introduction: Rachel Sprouse

Allinllachu? Hola! Hello! My name’s Rachel, but to many of my close friends and colleagues, I’m affectionally known as Sprouse. I’m originally from Stonington, Connecticut and spent the majority of my adolescence bouncing around the Northeast, finally settling on New York City—where I’ve now lived for five years. I’ve long had an interest in languages…. Read more »

WAYK Summer Team Introduction: Robbie Penman

I’ve just come back from my first walk into the middle of Saint Paul, Alaska, where I could see to all corners of the island…and I was sure I could smell reindeer. The mossy subarctic landscape looks surprisingly like the Lake District back in the U.K., where I spent a lot of my childhood. So… Read more »

WAYK Summer Team Introduction: Talia London

Aang! My name is Talia London and I grew up as a guest on Lummi territory, a Native nation in the Pacific Northwest. I am a descendent of the Aleut village of Nikolski. Currently I am a graduate student pursuing a PhD in Social Justice Education at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. My experiences as… Read more »

Latest
  • Whose Drink Is That?

  • Who’s On First?

    The second question you ask in the WAYK game: “Who is that?/Whose is that?”, setting it up with a “Craig’s List” of pronouns: Me/Mine, You/Yours, He/His, She/Hers. Why do we start out so simply, and add bite-sized pieces, one at a time, constantly “starting over, starting at the beginning”? Abbot and Costello’s famous routine shows… Read more »

  • WAYK Techniques: “Obviously!”

    A core technique of the game, “Obviously!” shapes the props, setup, conversation, and play of the game. We strive to make everything as obvious as possible – we want the “right” answer to be the first thing that pops into the players minds, naturally and obviously. [vodpod id=Groupvideo.3427880&w=425&h=350&fv=clip_id%3D6601126%26server%3Dvimeo.com%26autoplay%3D0%26fullscreen%3D1%26md5%3D0%26show_portrait%3D0%26show_title%3D0%26show_byline%3D0%26context%3Duser%3A2215755%26context_id%3D%26force_embed%3D0%26multimoog%3D%26color%3D00ADEF%26force_info%3Dundefined] more about “WAYK Techniques: “Obviously!” on Vimeo”,… Read more »

  • “What is that?” in Greek

    After introducing the game to your players, in WAYK you always first ask, “What-is-that?”, beginning the first step of the conversation that will take you to fluency. This five-minute short by Constantin Pilavios reminds us why we always come back to that question, exemplifying the technique, “Start over, start at the beginning.” [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mNK6h1dfy2o&hl=en&fs=1&rel=0]

  • The WAYK “Universal Speed Curriculum”

    I plan to make a free downloads page somewhere on the site, and to kick it off, I thought I’d post up Evan’s “Universal Speed Curriculum”, a conversational curriculum composed of English questions and answers, between two people. So, how do you use the “USC”? Essentially, you’ll recognize in it the base conversation occurring in… Read more »

  • The Fluency Game at Sunflower River Farm

    Enjoy watching the good time we had hosted by Alan Post and the good folks at Sunflower River Farm! Or try the direct download here. [vodpod id=Groupvideo.3290293&w=425&h=350&fv=clip_id%3D6293945%26server%3Dvimeo.com%26autoplay%3D0%26fullscreen%3D1%26md5%3D0%26show_portrait%3D0%26show_title%3D0%26show_byline%3D0%26context%3Duser%3A2215755%26context_id%3D%26force_embed%3D0%26multimoog%3D%26color%3D00ADEF%26force_info%3Dundefined] more about “”Where Are Your Keys?”: the Language …”, posted with vodpod

  • The Fluency Paradigm

    We seek Fluency, not Knowledge. We belong to a culture of “knowledge”, a culture of certification. The self-taught genius, the high-performing maverick, though we may regard them with awe and envy, we don’t encourage our children to follow that risky path. We see the safe route as a plodding journey of toil along a well-traveled… Read more »

  • “Where Are Your Keys?”

    We learn more, more quickly, and more deeply, once we redefine true learning as fluency, and play our way to getting there. Evan Gardner, a learning technology innovator, developed the language fluency game “Where Are Your Keys?” after observing for several years the teaching techniques that seemed to work most effectively for the greatest amount… Read more »

  • An Interview with Evan Gardner

    Listen to Willem interview Evan about “Where Are Your Keys?”.